Accomodating disability employer

The Guidance also covers different types of reasonable accommodations related to job performance, including job restructuring, leave, modified or part-time schedules, modified workplace policies, and reassignment. Questions concerning the relationship between the ADA and the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) are examined as they affect leave and modified schedules. Reassignment issues addressed include who is entitled to reassignment and the extent to which an employer must search for a vacant position. The Guidance also examines issues concerning the interplay between reasonable accommodations and conduct rules. These barriers may be physical obstacles (such as inaccessible facilities or equipment), or they may be procedures or rules (such as rules concerning when work is performed, when breaks are taken, or how essential or marginal functions are performed). Reasonable accommodation removes workplace barriers for individuals with disabilities. INTRODUCTION GENERAL PRINCIPLES REQUESTING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION AND JOB APPLICANTS REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION RELATED TO THE BENEFITS AND PRIVILEGES OF EMPLOYMENT TYPES OF REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS RELATED TO JOB PERFORMANCE JOB RESTRUCTURING LEAVE MODIFIED OR PART-TIME SCHEDULE MODIFIED WORKPLACE POLICIES REASSIGNMENT OTHER REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION ISSUES UNDUE HARDSHIP ISSUES BURDENS OF PROOF INSTRUCTIONS FOR INVESTIGATORS APPENDIX: RESOURCES FOR LOCATING REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS INDEX This Enforcement Guidance clarifies the rights and responsibilities of employers and individuals with disabilities regarding reasonable accommodation and undue hardship.

A cleaning company rotates its staff to different floors on a monthly basis. While his mental illness does not affect his ability to perform the various cleaning functions, it does make it difficult to adjust to alterations in his daily routine.

Reasonable accommodation is available to qualified applicants and employees with disabilities.

Reasonable accommodations must be provided to qualified employees regardless of whether they work part- time or full-time, or are considered "probationary." Generally, the individual with a disability must inform the employer that an accommodation is needed. For a further discussion of this issue, see Question 31, infra. "[W]ith or without reasonable accommodation" includes, if necessary, reassignment to a vacant position.

There are several modifications or adjustments that are not considered forms of reasonable accommodation.

An employer does not have to eliminate an essential function, i.e., a fundamental duty of the position.

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There are a number of possible reasonable accommodations that an employer may have to provide in connection with modifications to the work environment or adjustments in how and when a job is performed. Thus, if an employee is no longer qualified because of a disability to continue in his/her present position, an employer must reassign him/her as a reasonable accommodation.

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